NY Times’ 1619 Project gets trashed!

America founded on racism, debunked! 

A New York Times columnist just drove a sharp stake through the heart of his own newspaper’s mendacious 1619 Project. In the Sunday New York Times itself, no less. 

“The 1619 Project has failed,” Bret Stephens writes. It is “a thesis in search of evidence, not the other way around.”

Ah, but it did succeed, he writes later, in destroying the newspaper’s credibility by substituting ideology-driven cant for journalism. “Through its overreach, the 1619 Project has given critics of The Times” — those who accuse the newspaper of being “fake, biased, partisan and an arm of the radical left … a gift.”

The bottom line of this Marxist agitprop is that America is irredeemably and foundationally racist. As such, 1619 forms the intellectual ballast justifying the toppling of Wisconsin’s Miss Forward (a porto-feminist) and Col. Heg statues — the latter an abolitionist who gave his life fighting slavery.

The 1619 Project, for the record, preaches that “the true birth date” of the United States is not 1776 but 1619. That is when the first shipload of slaves docked at Jamestown colony, Virginia. That “out of slavery — and the anti-Black racism it required — grew nearly everything that has truly made America exceptional.”

“Nearly everything?” asks the incredulous columnist. 

What about, say, the ideas contained by the First Amendment? Or the spirit of openness that brought millions of immigrants through places like Ellis Island? Or the enlightened worldview of the Marshall Plan and the Berlin airlift? Or the spirit of scientific genius and discovery exemplified by the polio vaccine and the moon landing? 

Bad history, bad journalism

Stephens points out that slavery is as old as the Bible and already existed in the New World. “For all its horror, there was nothing particularly surprising that slavery made its way to the English colonies on the Eastern Seaboard.”

“What was surprising,” he writes, “was that in 1776 … “that all men are created equal” came into existence through the Declaration of Independence.” 

That the ideals of 1776 were not fully realized does not condemn the American idea but describes the human condition. “Ideals aren’t false merely because they are unrealized,” Stephens observes. “Most of us, at any given point in time, are falling short of some ideal we nonetheless hold to be true or good.” As Abraham Lincoln wrote in 1859, that foundational document would forever serve as a “rebuke and stumbling block to the very harbingers of reappearing tyranny and oppression.”

Incredibly, and a-historically, the 1619 Project posited that the War of Independence was fought to preserve slavery! And that the struggle against slavery and for civil rights “has been borne on the backs of Black Resistance.” WRONG again! Stephens quotes Pulitzer Prize winning historian James McPherson (Do read his Battle Cry of Freedom.) 

From the Quakers in the 18th century, on through the abolitionists in the antebellum, to the Radical Republicans in the Civil War and Reconstruction, to the N.A.A.C.P., which was an interracial organization founded in 1909, down through the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s, there have been a lot of whites who have fought against slavery and racial discrimination, and against racism.

⇒ Purpose is to guilt Americans into paying reparations. Read it here.

Indoctrinating our children

Stephens scolds his own newspaper for pushing its racist agit-prop on the nation’s impressionable school children:

It’s one thing for a newspaper to publish the 1619 Project by way of challenging its subscribers … It’s quite another to become a pedagogical product for schoolchildren who, along with their parents, in most cases probably don’t subscribe. …

When “1619” was spray-painted on a toppled statue of George Washington, many people took angry or horrified notice. When [1619 Project coordinator Nikole] Hannah-Jones tweeted that “it would be an honor” for the summer’s unrest to be called “the 1619 riots,” the right took notice again. 

For many, the 1619 Project smacked of fake history coming from the “fake news” — with results that were all too real. As unbidden gifts to Donald Trump go, it could hardly have been sweeter than that.

⇒ It’s being taught in over 4,000 school districts, including Chicago.

UPDATED: “To answer your question relative to the teaching of the New York Times’ 1619 project in [Madison WI] classrooms, the use of this material is not an official part of MMSD curriculum.  However, we do allow teachers a degree of discretion to incorporate appropriate materials or resources into their individual instruction to coincide with (or support) our official curriculum, which might include New York Time’s 1619 project. MMSD has long practiced providing its teachers discretion to incorporate unofficial but relevant material into their instruction in order to expose students to a variety of ideas and diverse concepts.” — MMSD spokesman Tim LeMonds.

Blaska’s Bottom LineThe President has threatened to cut federal funding from any school that pumps the 1619 bilge into its classrooms. Please do so, sir. Ask Joe Biden if he would reverse that needed corrective.

About David Blaska

Madison WI
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60 Responses to NY Times’ 1619 Project gets trashed!

  1. Cornelius Gotchberg says:

    ” ‘there was nothing particularly surprising that slavery made its way to the English colonies on the Eastern Seaboard.’ ”

    That African slavery was a system imported from the Caribbean, where it had been in existence for several hundred years prior, probably had nothing to do with it.

    Of the African slaves that survived the Middle Passage, fewer than 4 % made it to what is now the United States.

    Henry Louis Gates (who is reportedly black): “Between 1525 and 1866, in the entire history of the slave trade to the New World, according to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, 12.5 million Africans were shipped to the New World. 10.7 million survived the dreaded Middle Passage, disembarking in North America, the Caribbean and South America. And how many of these 10.7 million Africans were shipped directly to North America? ONLY ABOUT 388,000. That’s right: a tiny percentage. In fact, the overwhelming percentage of the African slaves were shipped directly to the Caribbean and South America; Brazil received 4.86 million Africans alone!” (bolds/caps/italics mine)

    It gets worse.

    “In 1855, Frederic Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who designed New York’s Central Park, was in Alabama on a pleasure trip and saw bales of cotton being thrown from a considerable height into a cargo ship’s hold. The men tossing the bales somewhat recklessly into the hold were Negroes, the men in the hold were Irish. Olmsted inquired about this to a shipworker.

    “ ‘Oh,’ said the worker, ‘the n*****s are worth too much to be risked here; if the Paddies are knocked overboard or get their backs broke, nobody loses anything.’ ” (bolds mine)

    The Gotch

    Liked by 1 person

    • Gg Mo says:

      * Yes, Too much documentation sunk the “good ship”1619 project. One entertaining and informative (sourced) read, among 100’s : Jim Goad, “The Redneck Manifesto: How Hillbillies, Hicks, and White Trash Became America’s Scapegoats.”
      And then there”s slave holder Anthony Johnson ,and among others (the interesting majority among the 1.7 % of Americans who own slaves *Documented as well ) who’s names/tribe can not be mentioned.(or gulag for us)

      Like

  2. sentient7 says:

    Interesting letter in our local paper that predates Dave’s column by a few days. Will the legislature address question of K12 use of subversive curriculum?
    Paste of letter from Friday’s Lakeland Times below related to 34th Assmb. District:

    To the Editor:

    This election pits Democrat Kirk Bangstad against incumbent Rob Swearingen. We are familiar with Rep. Swearingen’s views on many specific issues. Mr. Bangstad is vocal about a few issues, but he remains publicly silent about others. Therefore, we ask Mr. Bangstad to answer these questions before we vote:

    1. Do you support a legislative audit of the proportion of UW professors who self-identify as Marxists, Neo-Marxists, and anarchists so that students can avoid indoctrination?

    2. Do you support the organization: Black Lives Matter?

    3. Do you believe Wisconsin citizens should pay for free medical care for illegal aliens?

    4. Do you believe taxpayers should pay reparations to Black people?

    5. Citizens are concerned about the use of communist books in K12 education. Do you support an assessment of school district curriculums to advise districts against using radical or communist educational materials like “The 1619 Project,” or Howard Zinn’s “A Peoples’ History of the United States”?

    Like

    • Amos Roe says:

      While nothing like some people, I’ve read more than the normal amount of history books over the years. I read Zinn’s “A Peoples’ History of the US” in the mid-80’s and I certainly thought it was a worthwhile read.
      Can anyone explain to me why this book is a no-no? Any reason it can’t be an important part of a balanced approach to the history of our country? Appreciate responses from anyone who has actually read this book.

      Like

      • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

        “Any reason it can’t be an important part of a balanced Any reason it can’t be an important part of a balanced approach to the history of our country??”

        The Gotch (verified Purchaser/Reader of the Bicentennial Edition) would say it can be “a part of a balanced approach to the history of our country,” not (IMO) a necessarily important one.

        Zinn has no shortage of detractors, across the ideological spectrum, not the least of which would be Stanford Education Professor Sam Wineburg:

        “Zinn’s desire to cast a light on what he saw as historic injustice was a crusade built on secondary sources of questionable provenance, omission of exculpatory evidence, leading questions and shaky connections between evidence and conclusions.”

        A (IMO) great read is Nancy Isenberg’s White Trash The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America

        It contends that the Class evolutionary aspect of America is of FAR greater import, across a MUCH larger spectrum, than Race.

        It should be noted that Isenberg has her fair share of detractors as well.

        The Gotch

        Like

      • sentient7 says:

        Check the footnotes for documentation. In the edition that I bought, none provided.
        Gross distortions about actual living conditions and behavior of “indigenous people” that is violent, racially tribalist, and cannibalistic is ignored, relative to pain and suffering that seems only to be the characteristic of Europeans. Compare angst/sorrow of Wounded Knee and Trail of Tears…………………to Aztec cannibalism and enslavement of other indigenous tribes. Research it yourself. Weigh the object terror of Aztec’s to Jackson. Heck, even the loaded “500 Nations” video didn’t bleach the blood of the hundreds of steps of the Aztec temple.

        Regarding Uncle Tom’s Cabin — Amazing to me that you did not know that she plagiarized the book, The Autobiography of Josiah Henson. Talk about a white woman appropriating the work of a black man!! Ya might read a little more, including The Mind of the Master Class, by Eugene & Elizabeth-Fox Genovese

        Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Sentient7 – I know about the brutality with which the Spaniards treated the native populations in the New World. I also know, which I first learned from Zinn’s history, about Columbus’s insane levels of brutality which was practiced against the Arawaks in particular. Chopping off the limbs of men, women and children for their amusement while committing near total genocide of a native population, all the while carrying around change purses made from the Arawak scrotums? Yeah, Howard Zinn himself ruined Columbus Day for me, and I don’t feel any the worse for it. Especially since it doesn’t mean I have to give up a cherry pie.

          Of course the Aztecs were a hated empire by their neighbors/subjects. That’s the only reason Cortez was able to overthrow this brutal militaristic empire with a handful of troops following a leader who was operating on a different level of guts than almost any other man in history that I know of. Cortez succeeded because he made an alliance with the neighboring Tlaxcalans, Texcocans and Totonacs who provided a combined army of something like 100,000 soldiers. His own troops numbered in the hundreds. It’s like how the French, during the American Revolution, finally gave the colonies the ability to beat the British. Just on a larger and more impressive scale.

          I don’t understand why you would bring up the brutal nature of the Aztec Empire in this context, unless you aren’t really claiming that the Spanish Empire was somehow not as bad as what most informed people thought, simply based on well-accepted historical facts.
          I thought those facts had been established long before Zinn was born. Is this what you are really saying? If so, it sounds to me like a case of setting Stalin against Hitler and saying “choose your poison.” But in this case, you’re not just going back 90 years, but actually 500! Please tell me what your point is, because I do not understand it. Bartalome de las Casas? Who’s he? Just another “revisionist” historian whom no one should be reading today? Was he writing some “balanced” historical account during his time? Well, I’d actually say probably, at least much more so than any of the court “historians” of the time.

          Regarding Zinn’s book, I’d like to know what edition you bought (sic) that has no footnotes, and why you would ever buy or read any history book that doesn’t have footnotes. Have you actually read Zinn’s book or do you just own a copy? Can’t find my copy right now, but I know it has tons of footnotes. I also know I wouldn’t have even considered reading it, if it didn’t. Please let me know what edition you have – I’m genuinely interested.

          I checked out some of the supposedly persuasive critiques of Zinn’s “accuracy” out there on the web and can find nothing of substance yet. Can you direct me to particular ones that I should read? Rather, all I found were basically meaningless vague critiques of his book because he did not write a “balanced” book of American history.

          Here, for example is an excerpt from a 2013 New Republic critique of his book:

          “In writing as or about radicals, historians owe it to their readers to include the bad with the good, the ignoble with the noble—not in the service of ‘balance’ but in the pursuit of intellectual honesty. The most regrettable aspect of Howard Zinn’s full and lusty (note the gratuitous barb – AR) life is not that he chose to ignore this responsibility. It is that he never seemed aware of it in the first place.”

          Now, consider these words from the very same review:

          “Zinn justified his overt display of sympathy with a stark methodological declaration. He abjured any pretense of having written a comprehensive or balanced account. Having long ago disavowed objectivity, having dismissed even the hope of unpoliticized scholarship, Zinn stated plainly that he meant to take sides.”

          So who is at fault here? A historian who frankly declares his intent to write a one-sided book as an anecdote to other one-sided books, or some critic who apparently can’t process plain English?

          To me, the answer is obvious, but I understand why it isn’t so obvious to many people in a field which is teaming with ideologues. More often than not – nearly always? – these ideologues refuse to recognize that’s what they are. This point was well-made in the NYT editorial which mentions the degeneration of history in the hands of journalists who think that ideology should trump a honest attempt at objectivity.

          Rather than give materials to their students which engage their minds in learning HOW to think, too many students are committed to teaching their students WHAT to think. In this case, I guess it all boils down to one book which has sold an amazing 2.5 million copies. And whose fault is that? The guy who wrote that one book, or the “educators” who are telling their benighted students that this is the single defining work regarding an interpretation of American history?

          Telling kids WHAT to think is easy. Teaching them HOW to think is much more difficult. I’ve always admired the chutzpa of those history teachers who are so sure of themselves that they can have the wisdom and knowledge to tell their students what is the “truth. Well…..OK…..maybe not.

          A comment regarding your playing the race card in trying to dismiss Beecher Stowe’s towering achievement in the American war against slavery: Stowe did not “plagiarize” Henson’s 1849 book. She was inspired by it. This is a fact which she made clear (p43) in her defense of Uncle Tom’s Cabin entitled “A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, presenting the original facts and documents upon which the story is founded together with corroborative statements verifying the truth of the work.” In 1853 she published this non-fiction accompaniment work to her novel in response to the massive hostility which UTC engendered among slavery apologists, the entire South in particular.

          Do you not understand how artistic creativity works? Great fictional works owe their inspiration to real life ALL THE TIME. Henson provided an account of his life to a transcriber and published his narrative in 1849. Beecher-Stowe read it, along with countless other things which were instrument in fueling her overwhelming passion against slavery, and she was inspired to turn his story into a novel which ended up having profound consequences in the war against slavery.

          I think the basic question is this: What would have been the odds that a book (which I’m ashamed to say I have not read yet) by a former black slave would have any impact at all regarding the fight over slavery in the middle of the 19th century? The answer is just about zero, had Beecher-Stowe not read it.

          So what is more important to you: the individual publishing success of one man or the success in a country’s battle against slavery? Henson’s book made it to 9,000 copies until Stowe’s book also created a renewed interest in that book and Henson himself. Due to Beecher-Stowe, and Beecher-Stowe only, Henson went on to be in high demand as a public speaker. For me, it was the fact that two people, one white, the other black, who had never met each other at the time these books were published, were synergistically working together against a common enemy. Does something like this always really have to boil down to the color of someone’s skin? Frankly, given the kind of world we are all facing today, many of us are just SO tired of this contrived and destructive racist narrative.

          Finally, thanks for that suggestion of “The Mind of the Master Class,” sans the gratuitous insult of “Ya might read a little more.” (Some of us, although you’d never believe it from posts like this one, are not retired.)
          I checked out some reviews of the book, and it might indeed be a book I’d enjoy reading. Wondering what in particular you got from this book that made you recommend it so highly?

          Like

        • sentient7 says:

          Amos — short reply to your post w/questions. No idea where in sequence it will appear.

          RE: Comparative violence of Spanish – Arawaks? More to story after Carib’s killed some Spaniards. Point is that Zinn ignores the immorality and violence of Spanish was exceeded by the Indigenous Aztecs. Similarly, compare the violence at Wounded Knee ( # deaths) to the murder of 80-250,000 victims by the Aztecs. *see https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/01/tower-human-skulls-mexico-city-aztec-sacrifices

          From PBS. [ https://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/aztec-massacre-program-transcript/97/ ]
          “When they had the opportunity, the Aztecs would take captives and make a public display of them. They actually took the skin off the face and their hands, tanned it and sent it around to a lot of these wavering cities. ” —> continuing:
          The Spanish in Zultepec …further examination of their bones is revealing that their desecration continued, even after death.
          The unfortunate victims had been captured, imprisoned, sacrificed to the Aztec gods and dismembered. Their still-beating hearts had been ripped from their chests. And now there is evidence they were eaten as well.
          Enrique Martinez‘s storeroom contains thousands of artifacts found at Zultepec. One of Enrique’s most prized relics is a stone chamber that was used to hold human hearts during the ritual sacrifices. But even among all these priceless treasures, it is the bones that provide the most information about the massacre.
          Whole skeletons tell one story, but individual bones tell another. Once the captives had been sacrificed, their bodies were dismembered and ritually prepared. The long bones were given to the warriors as trophies. But first, they had to be stripped of flesh and treated.
          >Narrator: The preparation of all these bones suggest that the sacrificial killing was just step one, followed by cooking…and eating…
          >Dr. Enrique Martinez: SP: As well as being ingested the bone has been chewed and eaten too… bit by bit. This is another characteristic that you will notice in the preparation of the bones.
          ———————————-
          What edition of Zinn’s book?
          Sorry, don’t know, but it must have been one of first PB editions. I’ve moved 3X since reading it. Pitched the book (along with many others–too costly to move).
          However, I think https://thefederalist.com/2020/02/08/debunking-left-wing-historian-howard-zinn-is-like-shooting-fish-in-a-barrel/ supports my view. From the article, I thought these passages best affirm my criticism of Zinn. —>
          Historian Eric Foner called Zinn’s view “a deeply pessimistic vision of the American experience.” Liberal historian Art hur Schlesinger called Zinn “a polemicist, not a historian” and the historian Eugene Genovese, though a Marxist himself, thought the book was so bad that he refused to review it.
          … Zinn continuously broke the standards of the American Historical Association, misrepresenting sources, omitting critical information, falsifying evidence, and even plagiarizing. Grabar asks a good question at the end of her book: Would Zinn’s defenders support distorted history for another purpose? …
          Grabar sums up Zinn’s book like this: “The stories he put into A People’s History of the United States weren’t balanced factual history, but crude morality tales designed to destroy Americans’ patriotism and turn them into radical leftists.”

          I look forward to reading Grabar’s book, and “No,” I don’t agree with the Amazon review by JayG. Ironically, while you support Zinn’s ideological sermon, you later opine in your post:

          “Rather than give materials to their students which engage their minds in learning HOW to think, too many students [sic- teachers–like Zinn?] are committed to teaching their students WHAT to think.”

          Relative to your comments on Stowe. I agree, her book amplified abolitionist sentiments in a powerful way and contributed to Northern support for war. OTOH, it wasn’t until years later that she credited Henson for his book. I’m not an expert in the area, but the African-American history professor for whom I was both an RA and TA for two years thought it was outrageous that Stowe did not provide credit to Henson except as a belated gesture. About this, I deferred to his professional assessment. He assigned Henson’s Autobiography as one of the required texts in the history survey course.
          ———————————-
          RE: Genovese’s ? If you read Mind of the Master Class, I think you’ll gain an appreciation of the staggering volume of archival research that he and his late wife analyzed. Yes, they have critics……..but A Consuming Fire; The Southern Tradition; Roll Jordon, Roll; and The Pol. Economy of Slavery are a few of those that I enjoyed reading.

          Others? A few of the better books that I’ve read: David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation; Peter Coclanis, The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920; Conjectures of Order: Intellectual life and the American South, 1810-1860.

          Like

  3. Bill says:

    For those who are descendants of slaves brought to America, I can only say that I am truly sorry for what your ancestors went through. That said, did you ever hear of the Holodomor that happened in the Ukrainian region of Stalin’s Soviet Union? They estimate that between 3-12 million people starved to death as a result of Stalin’s policies. Despite the fact that there was plenty of food, the Ukrainian people were not allowed to eat it. The hunger got so bad that people turned to cannibalism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor

    Or how about the Irish Potato famine? Some 1 million of my ancestors died in that famine despite the fact that there was, once again, plenty of food to be had. The English overlords did not allow the Irish to eat it. https://www.irishcentral.com/news/irish-famine-genocide-british

    Then there is the Holocaust, where 6+ million Jewish people were exterminated by the Nazi’s.

    This are but just a few examples of the past man’s inhumanity to his fellow man.

    In our modern time we also have an example of man’s inhumanity to his fellow man. Did you know that each year in the City of New York, more Black babies are killed by abortion than there are born alive. http://tneagleforum.org/blog_direct_link.cfm?blog_id=65521. And yet we taxpayers support organizations like planned parenthood with our tax dollars.

    Talk about racist.

    Point is that there have been and always will be men who seek the enslavement and destruction of their fellow men.

    As Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn wrote in the Gulag Archipelago,

    “If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?”

    Just as there will always be people who wish to enslave or kill their fellow human beings, their will always be people who will fight and die to free them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Batman says:

      Hey Bill, outstanding comment!
      Batman has been writing the same thing on various platforms for some years now but does not seem to resonate much and for my history lesson I have been labeled a racist and white supremacist, big surprise. It is not easy to break into the refractory mind of cultists.

      Like

    • Amos Roe says:

      Bill – I think there is a fundamental difference between abortion, which is the choice of the parent(s,) and the parents only, and the kind of genocide of whole groups of people that you mention. That said, I certainly don’t support using tax-paying money to fund abortion.

      Also, I think that it is justified fear, much more than a mass pychosis of evil, which results in the success of the kinds of genocide which you mention………along with the lack of a 2nd Amendment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bill says:

        Amos,

        Thank you for your thoughts.

        I do have to disagree with you when you say there is a difference between abortion and the genocide of whole groups of people. I would posit that when one can make an argument that the unborn are not people, then one can make the same argument about other groups of people. It really doesn’t matter which group you are talking about, Jew’s, Kulags, Blacks, Gypsies, Irish, the un-born, whatever; you de-humanize a portion of humanity. Whenever you de-humanize a portion of humanity, you de-humanize all of humanity.

        Christ himself said in the Holy Bible in the book of Matthew, “Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’

        “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?’ Then he will answer them, saying, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”

        Just my opinion, and take it from a person who really struggles with his own faith and who is not the shining example of faith in God: Far, far better to go to Heaven than go to hell. I can only pray that we all see each other in Heaven someday.

        Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Bill,
          Thanks for your sensitive comments. They reflect the views of other friends, all of whom I respect greatly. I’m replying to your comments only if you think that abortion should be made illegal.

          I think abortion should be a woman’s own choice. Period. Opponents of abortion are operating from a matter of faith. But if it’s truly based upon faith, then why isn’t this a matter to be decided on the Judgement Day between the woman and God? What gave the government the right to play God in the meantime?

          Having an abortion effects NO ONE but the individuals involved. (See the exception regarding taxing others to pay for abortion which I’ve strongly opposed since the first day
          it was being proposed in this country.) Everyone in the world can be having abortions, but it is impossible to inflict what you and many others consider a great evil upon anyone else. This is the fundamental difference between abortion and genocide or the murder of other people who have no relationship to a person who chooses an abortion.

          I don’t understand how other people find they should be entitled to play God with other people who are in a position which they can’t possibly understand. Isn’t this as clear a case of government tyranny as anything one can think of? Frankly, I find it appalling that there are people in this country who actually oppose abortion even the mother has been raped by a stranger. Forcing a woman who has undergone a brutally traumatic event like rape to then carry that fetus around for 9 months within her own body? And then to hear these people call themselves “Christians.” Just not buying it.

          OUTLAWING ABORTION DOES NOT STOP IT AT ALL. It just drives women into back alleys who end up bleeding out from coat hangers. I don’t have the time right now to dig up the statistics but I’m pretty sure this has been an established fact for many years. And that even still happens today where it’s legal – not more than a week or so ago I was talking with a friend who has personal experience in helping frightened and distraught young women who have undergone that method.

          Thanks again for your respectful and thoughtful comments. Like I said, I am only responding to you under the impression that you are arguing that abortion should be made illegal.

          Like

    • patrickmoloughlin says:

      In fact, the English were EXPORTING food from Ireland during the famine.

      Like

  4. Amos Roe says:

    Sometimes the NYT can still show glimmers of editorial intelligence, although it’s very probable that the decision to run this important editorial was indeed simply a defensive one solely based on larger political calculations.

    Stephens, the NYT columnist, writes: “From the Quakers in the 18th century, on through the abolitionists in the antebellum, to the Radical Republicans in the Civil War and Reconstruction, to the N.A.A.C.P., which was an interracial organization founded in 1909, down through the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s, there have been a lot of whites who have fought against slavery and racial discrimination, and against racism.”

    Too bad he didn’t mention Harriette Beacher Stowe, a white woman writing in Maine. Her Uncle Tom’s Cabin was the single most powerful blow against slavery in the history of mankind. It’s a sad testament to the misplaced power of contemporary black racism that this book, which is an exciting and wonderful read, so unknown today. Unknown, except through everyone’s echoing of Black Power pejoratives from the 60’s/70’s about people who are an “Uncle Tom,” which represents a complete misreading of this powerful book.

    I’ll know that our schools are really getting serious about studying our country’s history of slavery when Uncle Tom’s Cabin becomes required reading for all high-schoolers.

    Like

    • almostarepublican says:

      I looked up the book and here’s what I found that may explain why it may not be used in high schools as a text. “The book and the plays it inspired helped popularize a number of stereotypes about black people.[14] These include the affectionate, dark-skinned “mammy”; the “pickaninny” stereotype of black children; and the “Uncle Tom”, or dutiful, long-suffering servant faithful to his white master or mistress. In recent years, the negative associations with Uncle Tom’s Cabin have, to an extent, overshadowed the historical impact of the book as a “vital antislavery tool.”[15]”

      Like

      • Amos Roe says:

        You’re right about the language. But who’s fault is that? I think it’s the fault of the teachers who, if they really respected the intelligence of their high school students, could easily make them understand the conventions of the time, 150 years ago, and thus enable them to embrace this powerful, moving, liberating and exciting book. But that would also take the ability to resist the ignorant violence and intimidation by today’s race hustlers. So good luck with that. Yes, I do understand why this book is not taught in any of our schools today.

        Regarding the character of Uncle Tom, i think the 60’s/70’s Black Power interpretation of his character strips him of his profound dignity as a human being. Any Christian at least, upon reading the book, will immediately understand this. Beecher-Stowe’s depiction of Uncle Tom is that of a real-world Jesus, rather than just an abject and beaten-down slave.
        She gives him the ultimate tribute.

        This issue is like the misunderstanding by which ignorant critics of “Huckleberry Finn” were able to hound out Twain’s masterpiece from some of our schools. These parents were CONVINCED that Huck’s line “you can’t learn a Niger” was an insult against black people. Some people, at a younger age in particular, just can’t understand satire, and I do get that.

        But mis-understanding the message in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which is deals with a subject that is of such interest to so many teenagers/young adults today? Makes sense only if you have not read the book, or you embrace hate and fear over love and courage.

        Like

  5. sentient7 says:

    See my comment above relative to plagiarism by Stowe of Henson!

    From 1976 on, we made every sophomore read 12 Years A Slave, completely as a condition to pass US history class. After I retired, the book was made into a movie. Book no longer used, far as I know. But, we were only one district….. clueless Madison DPI bureaucrats for over 20 years cared NOT for what we proved was a successful pedagogy.

    Like

    • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

      You’re a current (former?) educator, with Bonus Points for residing Nort of Hwy 8 and possibly(?) Nort of Hwy 2, am I right?

      The Gotch has always thought that one of THE most important questions to ask any prospective administrator or school board member would be:

      Which 20 books, from which 10 may be selected, would you determine to be required reading in order to receive a HS diploma?

      Don’t want to put you on the spot, but might you share a few of your picks?

      DISCLOSURE: The Gotch has the as yet unread 12 Years A Slave in his pedestrian library.

      You, GgMo, et al, are throwing out titles left-n-right, with no thought whatsoever of the crushing guilt some of…um…us might feel…with existing stacks of unread books mocking them as we speak…

      The Gotch

      Like

      • Gg Mo says:

        LOL ! None of the books I read have any value if I don’t read the Word of God, and Holy Fathers, and Saints first. I , too, have always had a stack with bookmarks, and post-its waiting fior me to finish.. toss, or give to someone who may be able to do more with it than I. It’s a process, and I had at least 2 mentioned here that I have GOT to get ahold of…..: )

        Like

        • Gg Mo says:

          I NEVER read “Oprah” books , or those “trending” in the zeitgeist ,unless to High-light and save as proof of the pushing of false-hoods, Market-place manipulation of the perpetually estrogen-pickled (women and low-T men) ,and Staged Agendas in “trendy” Management manual output.

          Like

        • Gg Mo says:

          Replying ti Amos Roe. No thank you (or “I prefer not to.” LOL) . I do prefer (rather then , what I consider a myriad of psychologically manipulative books/authors promoted/marketed w/ ginned-up enthusiasm, by an “intellectual” world of “story-telling” fiction-as-“Truth” MSM ,by the Kabbalah’practicing “spiritual” “icon” of this age ” O” ) , some one like Elias Canetti , and his “Crowds and Power” or “Auto Da Fe”. Yup, I still do not trust Billionaires.

          Like

      • Amos Roe says:

        “You, GgMo, et al, are throwing out titles left-n-right, with no thought whatsoever of the crushing guilt some of…um…us might feel…with existing stacks of unread books mocking them as we speak…”

        Amen. GgMo is indeed an evil presence here.

        Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Again, can’t reply directly to you, but GgMo you should reconsider your “NEVER” reading an Oprah recommendation.
          She was the one who spread the word on Ursula Hegi’s “Stones from the River.” Certainly one of the best novels I’ve ever read!

          Like

        • Gg Mo says:

          Oops, I see I can reply here. Joking/self-mocking about “Auot-Da-Fe'” but it does have a dwarf : )

          Like

  6. Mr. Forward says:

    “https://thefederalist.com/2020/02/08/debunking-left-wing-historian-howard-zinn-is-like-shooting-fish-in-a-barrel/

    Like

    • Amos Roe says:

      I just read that. Not impressed, to say the least. Your link is a blog recounting of the apparently undocumented assertions of Mary Grabar, whose Federalist Society published (conveniently after Zinn died) “Debunking Howard Zinn: Exposing the Fake History That Turned a Generation Against America.”

      Even 35 yrs after reading Zinn’s book, and with a bad memory, I’m sure she’s engaged in absurd hyperbole in certain parts which are mentioned.

      For a good review of this book, rather than just a blog echoing a bunch of baseless and totally unprofessional (from a good historian’s viewpoint) assertions, see Prof. JayG’s top-rated comment at Amazon. He give more detail about why he considers Grabar’s book a one star mess.

      Like

  7. Ed says:

    What took the NYT to have a columnist take so long?

    Like

  8. richard lesiak says:

    2600 new Covid cases and 7 deaths in one day. Only action from the gop is more law suits. How about some concern for that rather been playing wack the wennie about 1619. We are in deep dodo and all you guys just want to play with your Thesaurus.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Batman says:

      “Covid-19 cannot travel beyond 6′ and can live on all surfaces except for anything from Amazon. It does not live in Walmart, Home Depot, Lowe’s, or any grocery store. It is only deadly in small businesses, churches, and Trump rallies, but it cannot harm you if you are protesting, rioting, or looting.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Amos Roe says:

      Richard – A few days ago, when you brought this up, I tried to direct you to several important pieces regarding the reality of this issue. I think they expose the CoolAid you’re drinking, but YT and Facebook have banned those links. My posts to you also inexplicably “disappeared” into the ether by the machine that this site operates on. This happened twice in a row. I investigated this issue a bit further and understand that this was probably not coincidence or a fluke.
      We’ll see if this vague message makes it to you and then I’ll try again tomorrow, OK?

      Like

      • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

        “I investigated this issue a bit further and understand that this was probably not coincidence or a fluke.” (bolds mine)

        Would you be so kind as to elaborate?

        The Gotch

        Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Do a search on this. I didn’t spend much time regarding this, just enough to know it has been happening in the past, according to what others have said.
          Censorship by big tech is of course a huge issue and has been for some time. Understanding the ins and outs of this is beyond my paygrade, but you may already know all about this as well.
          David can probably speak to this in more detail. As owner of this site, he has the ability to moderate as he sees fit. However, since he certainly wouldn’t have been the culprit, I’m assuming it was done on a higher level. Maybe something that automatically ties in with what YT or FB censors?
          Like I said, I’ll try it again later in a few different ways with these links (even just verbal descriptions) and see if anything changes.

          Like

        • David Blaska says:

          Dunno why, Amos, but some of your posts wound up in Spam. Have restored them.

          Like

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          If one of The Gotch’s offerings goes missing, (quantifiable uptick since the return of a formerly banned participant) he knows/understands/accepts why; but time-n-again, there are headscratchers.

          Hadn’t thought moderation might be taking place at a higher level than that of the site administrator…until now…

          Perhaps Tech Savant Steve Witherspoon has some insight?

          The Gotch

          Like

        • Moderation at a higher level than the blogger; not a chance. WordPress would go out of business damn near overnight if they did that or they allowed someone outside WordPress or the blogger to do such a thing.

          My experience with WordPress is that sometimes things show up in the WordPress Reader before they show up in the HTML version of the blog, sometimes the delay takes longer than expected. Also if someone posts something that is kicked into moderation for some reason and they turn around post the exact same comment again right away it WILL hang their comments up in moderation until the blog moderator either releases them or rejects them. WordPress gets glitchy when duplicate posts are posted, I’ve complained about this – it’s an actual program bug.

          I’ve had some of mine get rejected on this and other WordPress blogs for unknown reasons in the past, I’m having just such an issue over at Windypundit right now. Usually these kind of things get fixed by the blogger or changing their settings but on rare occasions it’s actually the blogger moderating comments, remember this is the bloggers blog and it’s their choice as to what they choose to allow.

          Amos Roe should try rewording his comment and limiting included links; in other words test what is acceptable and stay within those limitations.

          Like

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          WordPress sites are not all administered as equal; including more than two (2) links will put a post into moderation here, more that one (1) will do so at Ethics Alarms.

          The Gotch

          Like

        • That’s a setting that’s chosen by the blogger. I have mine set to three, I think Blaska has his set to two and Ethics Alarms has it set at one, the default setting when setting up a blog on WordPress is anything more than one link puts it in moderation.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          There have been times when, after pressing post comment, it just spins for a while and reverts back to the top of the article page without posting the comment, which has apparently been sent to moderation; most eventually appear.

          No rhyme of reason for when or why.

          After successfully submitting, a page view of the posted comment always appears.

          The Gotch

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Replying here to you Gotch, because I see no way to reply to Steve or David’s posts. Thanks to all three of you for clarification regarding the workings of WordPress.
          Steve, I do hope your faith is not misplaced, given so many cases of well-documented heavy-handed big tech censorship, including the very links I’m trying to send.

          David, how do I retrieve those spam posts to give to Richard, or do I need to rewrite them? Any chance you can email them to me and then I can post them again myself, and I can massage them, if need be, to get them to go through this time? It would save me time.

          BTW, I’m pretty sure the second attempt already had omitted any links.

          Like

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          “Replying here to you Gotch, because I see no way to reply to Steve or David’s posts.”

          Just scroll up-thread to the 1st comment that features a Reply link. Click on that, compose you comment, post it, and it should nest properly underneath what you’re responding to.

          The Gotch

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Thanks Gotch, I will try your suggestion and see where this particular one lands.

          That said, note the comments thread right above where I’m replying. That thread starts with Richard’s covid remarks, but each of the responses to him also have a means of replying to each new responder. Which makes sense to me for clarity and order, given that the new response is now probablynot being directed to the original old response. In a conversation, you don’t keep coming back to the original first point, right? You often respond to the next point that is being made by someone else.

          Am I still missing something, or is this really just another case of what you guys have been saying in terms of “it sometimes works, sometimes doesn’t”?

          Like

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          It seems that Reply ability is only available “going out” three (3) responses.

          i.e.: The Gotch posts, you reply to it, and Steve replies to your response. A Reply option will be available to Steve’s response, but none to any subsequent response to his comment; that’s when you have to scroll back up to find a Reply link.

          Make sense?

          The Gotch

          Liked by 1 person

        • Gotch wrote, “It seems that Reply ability is only available “going out” three (3) responses.”

          That is also a setting that’s controlled by the blogger. I have mine set to 5 replies, once you go beyond that it gets difficult to read because the comment can look almost a vertical line of words.

          Also; if you use WordPress reader you can post directly under the comment you’re replying to most of the time because a Reply link is there all the time. The setting I mentioned above only affects the HTML version of the blog not the blog inside WordPress Reader. I use both regularly.

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Gotch – replying to your/Steve’s/Dave’s responses regarding number of replies allowed on a thread. It does make sense, and I noticed that as well.
          Thanks for the additional clarification on this, Steve.

          David, I’m putting in a plug for an unlimited number of response buttons on each thread. Since those threads are indented to the right a bit, I never had a problem with Disqus’s format, for example. You could just quickly scroll up or down to the next new post if you didn’t want to read the entire 25 back-and-forth responses that a popular comment section
          involving hundreds of different commentators can generate. That saves a lot of time for everyone.

          This is especially true as your comments section begins to grow, as it seems like it probably will. Push the damn button. 🙂

          Like

        • Amos Roe wrote, “David, I’m putting in a plug for an unlimited number of response buttons on each thread.”

          This is a completely unreasonable request.

          Did you not read my comment above where I wrote that “I have mine set to 5 replies, once you go beyond that it gets difficult to read because the comment can look almost a vertical line of words.” The display area for the comment in HTML is fixed and it can actually get to the point where a comment is a vertical line of letters and completely unreadable if you allow too many nested replies. I have a LARGE screen and 5 is the most I’d ever want to go.

          Use WordPress Reader if you want “unlimited” reply links and even there they do not indent nest the way you want. Just get used to it Amos.

          Like

        • Amos,
          Please follow the link below and scroll down to the bottom where the comments are so you can see what I’m talking about. The blog post is one where I’m just testing how things work on WordPress.

          https://stevewitherspoon.home.blog/2020/10/03/please-ignore-this-post-im-just-testing-a-bunch-of-wordpress-editor-block-features/

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Actually, maybe I’m wrong about this. Once you understand how this works, maybe it does make sense. Maybe post an advisory regarding this for those of us who don’t understand how to do it correctly?

          Like

        • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

          “the comment can look almost a vertical line of words.”

          Makes sense; some of the thin threads @EA confirm that.

          And a tres lengthy thread on…welp…threads? Something kinda Seinfeldian about that, am I right?

          The Gotch

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          “This is a completely unreasonable request.”

          It sounds like you’re right, Steve. Thanks for taking the time to try and explain this.

          I haven’t been involved with Disqus for several years, but now that I think about it, I
          think I did indeed have real problems when trying to print out back-and-forth responses
          that didn’t come out as columns with a couple of words per line. Seems like this should be child’s play on the part of programers to solve this issue, but maybe there’s something I don’t understand going on.

          Doesn’t Amazon have a different format in its review section that works well when it comes to this issue?

          Working from pretty much total ignorance on this.

          Like

        • You’re welcome Amos.

          As for other blogging formats, I really haven’t got a clue. I’ve only worked with WordPress and Google’s Blogger app which I tried but I don’t use.

          Side Note: Just so you’re aware. You seem to be using a carriage return at strange points in your paragraphs like in the middle of sentences which displays your comments kind of strangely. I really wouldn’t mention it but it seems to be a pattern that you’ve repeated. I don’t know if it’s you actually pressing the key or the device you’re using putting them in in weird spots.

          Like

        • Carriage return is the Enter key.

          Like

        • Amos Roe says:

          Steve – thanks a lot for that link. Don’t have time right now to assimilate this, hope it’s still
          up when I do. Interested in learning more about WordPress.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Amos Roe says:

          Steve – you bet I notice it, and it’s been the bane of my existence for years. I thought it just comes from editing my emails, within Apple Mail, but seems to happen here too. The problem is that it doesn’t show up on my screen so I can’t correct it. Drives me nuts and also shows up when I try to print something. My work-around is to first compose in a word program and then cut and paste the final draft, but I often forget to do that.
          Any insights into that are MUCH appreciated!

          Like

  9. Bret Stephens is likely on his way out.

    Like

    • Additional note…

      I think a major article that openly contradicts the mantra of social justice warriors written by a New York Times columnist and actually being published by the New York Times is signature significant and shows us that there is something major going on behind the scenes at the New York Times. The New York Times would not have published something like this six to eight months ago.

      Keep you eye on the New York Times.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Cornelius Gotchberg says:

      Perhaps; but he will have drop-kicked the NY Slimes directly in the ‘nads with nuclear power on his way out. A DAMNED fine legacy, am I right?

      There’s always been return volley ammo, from real historians, for any discussion of that bogus POS project, now some’s been supplied by one of their own!

      Oh, the suffocating irony!

      The Gotch

      Liked by 1 person

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