Paul Ryan: A smart and decent public servant

“What I realize is, if I am here for one more term, my kids will only have ever known me as a weekend dad,” Ryan said. “I just can’t let that happen.” — Paul Ryan

Payl Ryan and Jessie Rodriguez & son

Paul Ryan with State Rep. Jessie Rodriquez and her son

Our acquaintances on the Left are not the only ones exposing their bilious natures today at the retirement of Paul Ryan from public life. Too many of my fellow conservatives are bidding good riddance to what they call a RINO — a Republican in name only. Most of whom never bothered to run for elective office or made much of a difference if they did.

Try herding cats in a 435-member legislative body. Did you enact generational tax reform that will boost America’s worldwide competitiveness and fatten Everyman’s paycheck at the same time? So Paul Ryan did not want The Wall, America’s version of the Maginot Line. Good! Sending the National Guard to the border makes ever so much more sense!

Politics, my friends and acquaintances (for you ARE …) is the art of the possible. Democracies are messy and frustrating. You may pray for Mussolini but get Stalin, instead. To paraphrase Joseph Welch, Is there room for decency in American politics any more?

‘Generous in spirit’

Your Squire is stretching the limits of Fair Usage by quoting at length from Karl Rove’s column in today’s Wall Street Journal: 

Mr. Ryan will leave Congress with the respect of virtually every member of his caucus, to say nothing of Democrats who can’t help but like him despite their policy differences. 

No one else could have matched his performance at keeping House Republicans moving in a constructive direction over the last three years. That he did so while also deftly managing relations with this White House — not known for its maturity or predictability — is all the more impressive.

Mr. Ryan’s departure from the House will be a loss for the country, too. Like his mentor, Jack Kemp, Mr. Ryan is optimistic, generous in spirit, committed to outreach, and animated by ideas. He is willing to work across party lines, as in the 2013 budget deal. Throughout his public life, he has shown integrity, civility and decency — qualities much too rare in today’s coarse and ugly political culture.

He was made aware at an early age of life’s fragility when he discovered his father dead of a heart attack. His Catholic faith has helped shape his commitments, and anyone who knows Mr. Ryan is aware of his devotion to his wife and three teenage children.

There are exciting new chapters yet to be written for this extraordinary 48-year-old, perhaps in business, where his strong leadership and keen mind can be put to work. …

As we drove through small towns in southeast Wisconsin, our conversation was interrupted by irreverent calls on his pickup’s speakerphone from his brothers about a family dinner the next day. When he dropped me off that afternoon, I thought: This is one bright, decent and well-grounded human being. If only there more like him in politics.

“Generous in spirit.” I can think, off hand, of two people in public life to whom that applies: Tommy Thompson and the late Lyman Anderson. No haters, those two.

He searched for elusive solutions

Jim Geraghty writes in National Review:

The guy who liberals depicted throwing granny off the cliff . . . was also the kind of man goes into drug treatment centers, touches the scars from the “track marks” of heroin addicts, and prays with and for them. He was portrayed as some sort of heartless Ayn Rand acolyte when he emphasized how conservatives needed to find solutions for poverty. He was civil, well-informed, polite, and firm, the opposite of a table-pounding, demagogic extremist, and that probably just aggravated his critics on the Left even more. 


Cook Political Report: Ryan’s retirement shifts Wisconsin’s 1st CD from the Solid Republican column to the Lean Republican, with the potential for the race to become even more competitive.


Blaska’s Bottom Line: Paul Ryan will be back, maybe in 2024 at the head of the national ticket.

Advertisements

About David Blaska

Madison WI
This entry was posted in Republicans and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Paul Ryan: A smart and decent public servant

  1. richard lesiak says:

    It was not “tax reform”. It was a “tax cut” for the rich. It also put us deeper in debt. People in his own party hate this bill and held their nose while voting for it. Even trump hated it and said so. His only claim to fame is that he was never named in some investigation. Don’t worry about Ryan, he’ll be hired by someone, make a ton of money and do it outside the public’s view. You may be throwing rose peddles in front of him as he rides out of DC, but just remember that someone will have to clean up afterward.

    Like

  2. Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

    Perhaps one day, (probably not soon though,) liberals will come to know and appreciate the difference between cutting taxes and cutting the marginal tax rate. I don’t ever expect them to acknowledge that there is a difference because that would force them to abandon their faux outrage over debt that selectively emerges whenever discussing government revenues, but mysteriously disappears once government spending is the topic. It is a FACT that marginal cuts under Coolidge, JFK, Reagan, and George W, Bush, not only produced higher government revenues, but did so by collecting a higher percentage of that revenue from the “rich,” (their prefered term for high income earners.) Unfortunately, discussing economics with a liberal is much like playing chess with a pigeon. No matter what move you make, the pigeon will still knock over all the pieces, crap on the chessboard and then strut around as if he had won.

    Like

    • AnonyBob says:

      “…faux outrage over debt…”
      When it come to conservatives, irony IS dead.

      Like

    • richard lesiak says:

      The only people filing their taxes on a post-card are the wealthy. They just write in zero on the tax due line, sign and toss in the mail. No postage due of course.

      Like

      • David Blaska says:

        Mr. Lesiak, do you just pull things out of your nether region? According to the non-partisan Tax Foundation:

        • The share of taxes paid by the top 1 percent of taxpayers was 39.5%.
        • The upper half of all taxpayers paid 97.3% of all individual income taxes while the bottom 50% paid the remaining 2.7%.
        • The top 1 percent paid a greater share of individual income taxes (39.5%) than the bottom 90 percent combined (29.1%).
        • The top 1% of taxpayers paid a 27.1% individual income tax rate, which is more than seven times higher than taxpayers in the bottom 50% (3.5%).

        Like

      • Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

        Like I said Dave, don’t bother playing chess with the pigeons. What they know about wealth and taxes couldn’t fill a thimble. But for your information Bob, Trump is not a conservative, no matter how much you hate him. But please, tell me of all the times you railed against the deficits produced from 2008-2012, compared to your new found respect for fiscal responsibility in the past 12 months. Did you complain when Obama bailed out GM? I did. Did you call out Pelosi and Obama when they pushed through the disaster known as Obamacare? I did. Did you gripe when George W. Bush never even lifted his veto pen a single time to cut spending? Something tells me you didn’t, but I can tell you that I did. Did you complain when Trump signed the omnibus tax bill? Probably, but only about the tax rate cuts. I complained about the spending. So just like the puzzle page asks, how are these things different?

        Like

      • Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

        So tell me Richard, from where does your tax expertise come? The Cap Times?

        Like

      • coolkevs says:

        Sorry, I have to take issue with “Trump is no conservative” – actions definitely speak louder than words.
        https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/heritage-donald-trump-has-achieved-more-than-ronald-reagan-in-first-year

        Like

      • AnonyBob says:

        This is not difficult, Mr. O’L. I did not complain about deficits in 2008-2012 because Obama’s stimulus and spending on things like unemployment benefits saved the economy from the worst recession (compliments of the Bush GOP) since the Great Depression, while providing help that kept our auto industry from disappearing. Help that the auto industry was able to repay, with interest. A little deficit spending during a recession is a good thing. Creating a large deficit by cutting taxes for business in a time of record profits and expansion, and for the wealthy as the economy (Obama’s legacy) is humming along is…well, just greedy. Your Trump tax cut, Mr. O’L, will disappear. The ones for business and for things like capital gains (hello, wealthy GOP contributors!) are permanent.
        And Obamacare is popular enough with enough people that the hue and cry against eliminating it forced the GOP Congress, despite their majorities, to back down on their #1 issue. They’ve been losing legislative races ever since and are poised to be slaughtered in November, in large part for believing their own misguided rhetoric about Obamacare.
        And I agree with KoolKevs; Trump’s agenda is pretty standard “screw the poor and the middle class to benefit our friends” conservatism. He ain’t draining no swamps.

        Like

      • Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

        So Bob you have confirmed that you never complained about a deficit until Trump took office. And that what made the Obama deficits palatable to you was that they were incurred for all the right reasons such as bailing out GM. Put aside the nonsense that it “saved” the auto industry. It did nothing of the sort. What it did do was teach GM, their executives and stockholders that none of them will be held responsible for their poor products and bad decision making. Government stimulus? If you believe that government spending can stimulate the economy, you likely also believe that you can raise the water level in a swimming pool by taking a bucket of water from the deep end and pouring it into the shallow end.

        But the point is that you don’t ever have a problem with the spending regardless of your fallacious economic reasoning. Deficits are apparently only bad when revenues can’t catch the exponential increase in spending, right?

        Like I said, chess with a pigeon.

        Like

      • AnonyBob says:

        Wrong again, Mr. O’L, I have confirmed only that the GOP wailing and gnashing of teeth over deficit spending seems to occur only when Democrats to it to save a tanking economy. When the GOP does it to reward their benefactors during a strong economy (or to ignore the true costs of war), with nary a peep of concern over adding $1 trillion in debt, it smacks of rank hypocrisy. I don’t know about pigeons, but the concept of government spending stimulating an economy is hardly radical or untested.
        (5% growth? REALLY Splat? President Trade War will make sure that doesn’t happen.)

        Like

      • Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

        “the concept of government spending stimulating an economy is hardly radical or untested.” I have to agree with you here Abob, it has been tried again and again throughout history and has consistently failed to raise the water level in the pool so much as a millimeter. “Saving the economy?” I suggest you try reading a reputable text on economics where you’ll find that the idea of spending yourself into prosperity is insane. You can’t do it, and neither can the government. And you are still insisting that a cut to the marginal rate equals a tax cut and adds to the deficit.

        You may not know about pigeons, but you sure know how to knock the pieces off the board, drop a load of crap and strut about as if you have won the argument. I’m sure that works with others who don’t understand economics either.

        Like

      • Patrick M O'Loughlin says:

        coolkevs, I said Trump wasn’t a conservative. I didn’t say he he hasn’t done conservative things. He’s done many. But he’s also done more than a few non-conservative things, and expressed several liberal opinions over the years on issues. He’s not an idealogue.

        Like

    • richard lesiak says:

      Pigeon….yummy. Ohhhh for my days in Rome. Pigeon w/pearl barley and truffle risotto. A great bottle of red. If I only had a lobbyist to pick up the tab.

      Like

  3. AnonyBob says:

    Blaska sees bilious natures in others?

    Pot meet kettle.
    Takes one to know one.
    Irony is really dead.

    Take your choice.

    Like

  4. coolkevs says:

    I like Paul Ryan, but probably almost too nice for the body politic. Joe Biden ate him for lunch. The House seems to pass a lot of legislation, but it gets held up in the Senate (exhibit McCain -> Obamacare repeal). Wish him best on his future endeavors, but don’t you think Pence has the inside track if we’re talking 2024?

    Like

  5. Citizen Dave's Remington 700 says:

    Good riddance to cucky Republicans. But I guess I’m happy for him personally. More time to finally get through that really long John Galt speech at the end of Atlas Shrugged.

    Like

  6. richard lesiak says:

    Where did you get those numbers Dave; from Fox and Friends. Old news. The CBO just scored that mess congress passed and said it sucked. Ryan dropped it on them at the last minute, pushed for a quick vote, got it passed on party line votes and booked a Uber out of town. Someone put Russian sanctions in that bill and nobody even noticed. The gop used to be so tight they could shove a piece of coal up their butts and two days later poop out a diamond. Now they act like drunken sailors at a Stormy Daniels show.

    Like

  7. coolkevs says:

    National follows Wisconsin – The doorman says Trump has a love child!!! Didn’t they try that one on Walker? Although I could believe Trump has one more than Walker…

    Like

  8. madisonexpat says:

    The Left believes doubling the debt was good but it never caused anything but pitiful growth anywhere but government. They believe profit is theft and the more politicians control the economy the “fairer” it will be. Every evidence to the contrary must be forced through this belief.
    Try to explain to the pigeons compound interest and/or what happens when an economy hits an honest 5% growth year over year.
    The Left just hates prosperity because they have no extra legal power over an educated happy, prosperous citizen willing to protect his God given liberties. It just drives them crazy.

    Like

  9. richard lesiak says:

    At least we don’t have to worry about that fool Vos running for Ryan’s job. Said today not running. I guess he’s happy to stay in Madison looking at his pic’s of London. Lobbyists? All free? Maybe he was there learning how they maintain their roads. I just hope no peeing hookers story pops up.

    Like

    • David Blaska says:

      Amazing how you manage to degrade every conversation.

      Like

      • madisonexpat says:

        Tourettes Syndrome.

        Like

      • richard lesiak says:

        Four days in England all paid for by the title loan and payday loan lobby is degrading the conversation. He took the trip because he is a big fan of Churchill and had a meal with his granddaughter? With pending legislation in Madison no one talked business for the entire trip? The guy in Ohio already resigned over this and the FBI is involved? What’s being degraded is the office Vos holds.

        Like

      • AnonyBob says:

        Lesiak’s exactly right about this. How can a legislator accept such “things of value” from lobbying principals and you not see it as completely sleazy and unethical. It’s graft, and not so petty.

        Like

  10. wolveriner7 says:

    Paul Ryan may have been a neighborhood darling, qualifying him as a city council member in Janesville, but his hatred of the poor is despicable. The absurd tax cut for the wealthiest among us merely furthers the war on the Middle Class and the poor. The mushrooming debt cloud only ensures that more and more tax revenue will go toward paying toward (but not down) national debt, while government services that millions of Americans need will continue to shrink. Meanwhile, the “private sector” will continue to fail to provide the incomes that working people need to live free from the social support programs that Republicans detest. Our nation and its corrupt system of elections-for-sale is barely worth defending any more.

    Like

    • David Blaska says:

      “Hatred of the poor?” He is trying to lift them out of poverty, not subsidize their poverty.

      Like

    • richard lesiak says:

      Tread lightly wolveriner7….you’ll be accused of “degrading the conversation.” Even when you make a thoughtful, well written comment someone will cherry-pick four words, put them in quotes and then claim you are totally wrong, a Stalinist, liberal, progressive commie, etc etc. one thing is certain; Ryan will be fine. His pension is 75k/yr, he’ll find some 7 figure job and go yapping on Fox and Friends till he dies.

      Like

  11. Pingback: Paul Ryan: A smart and decent public servant - RightWisconsin

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s